"It is France that is being attacked". Macron reacts to attacks on Notre-Dame basilica

“If we are attacked, again, it is for our values, for our taste for freedom. We will not give up anything ”, assured Macron. In its turn. the Gallic Prime Minister stressed that "the democratic life that some wish to abolish must, more than ever, follow its path".

French President Emmanuel Macron assured this Thursday, October 29, that France will remain firm in the face of Islamic extremism, although it recognizes that the attack that took place in the basilica of Notre-Dame was committed not only against the three victims, but also against the nation, according to "Bloomberg".

"It is very clearly France that is being attacked," Macron said after speaking to the police and the church's emergency team, accompanied by the mayor of Nice, Christian Estrosi. “If we are attacked, again, it is for our values, our taste for freedom. We will not give up anything ”, assured Macron.

The French president has also decided to strengthen security and as such the number of soldiers deployed for the internal security operation will be increased from 3 to 7, with orders to protect churches and schools.

In turn, Christian Estrosi, who had been at the scene of the crime several hours before Macron's arrival, pointed out that a woman had been beheaded at around 9 am on Thursday inside the church, but gave no details on how the other two people died. The Mayor of Nice revealed that the police have so far arrested a suspect.

In addition to the attack on Notre-Dame, there were at least two other attacks in France on Thursday, while in Saudi Arabia a security guard was assaulted with a sharp object in front of the French consulate in the city of Jeddah. The French president believes the murders are related.

French Prime Minister Jean Castex has also spoken out on the matter, while speaking at the Senate in Paris, and stressed that "the democratic life that some wish to abolish must, more than ever, continue on its way".

French authorities estimate that since 2015 about 250 lives have been lost in jihadist attacks on French soil, some organized by terrorist networks and executed by militants who fought in Iraq and Syria, others by local lone attackers, who are often more difficult to attack. detect and prevent.

The attacks follow the assassination of Professor Samuel Paty on October 16, for showing a cartoon of the prophet Maóme during classes. This caused France to launch a wide-ranging crackdown on extremists, carrying out raids, closing a mosque and promising to dismantle suspicious groups and organizations.

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